Motivating decision makers to undertake DSM actions and set up organisations for the job.

DSM (Demand Side Managament) has changed since it was first introduced in the 1980s as an active policy instrument to make energy systems perform better and more economically. In the years since and primarily in the early years of the new millennium technology has provided new opportunities with smarter applications, decentralised power making use of local renewable sources and with a booming IT for management. We rather talk about Integrated DSM (IDSM).

Policy challenges to make energy systems sustainable and reduce (prevent) climate change has been more pronounced with the Paris accord as the ultimate example. Still market uptake is slow and well beyond expectations (and needs).

It is time for DSM to shape up and deliver!

Speaker for this webinar: Hans Nilsson

In November 2014, the G20 countries representing 80% of the World GDP, the World Energy Consumption and GHG emisions, launched the G20 Energy Efficiency Action Plan.

The Action Plan comprises a series of 6 concrete international collaboration on EE in buildings, networked devices, industry, power sector, transport and finance. In 2016 under the Chinese G20 Presidency, the collaboration on energy efficiency is being consolidated.

The Webinar will explain the latest achievements of the G20 Collaboration on energy efficiency. Each work stream generate outcomes, recommendations, principles that G20 Countries are invited to adopt.

This webinar will be the follow up of the webinar presented in January 2015 on what works and doenst in DSM behavioural interventions. Research has shown that achieving lasting behavioural change in DSM is unlikely to take place if only individual behaviours are targeted while the context in which these behaviours are embedded remains the same. Best practices examples and social scientific studies have accumulated over the past years and provide interesting insights. This presentation will report on relevant behaviour change research and practicable recommendations and approaches in the transport and SME domains.

This initiative, started as a task under the umbrella of the International Energy Agency, is entitled ´Closing the loop. Behavioural change in DSM: From Theory to Practice.

Nina Campbell will present the key findings of an important recent IEA publication entitled Capturing the Multiple Benefits of Energy Efficiency.

The traditional focus on energy savings as the main goal of energy efficiency policy has, at times, led to an underestimation of the full value of energy efficiency in both national and global economies. Energy efficiency can bring multiple benefits, such as enhancing the sustainability of the energy system, supporting strategic objectives for economic and social development, promoting environmental goals and increasing prosperity. The book contains a dedicated chapter on the benefits for macroeconomic growth, balancing public budgets, health and well-being, industrial competiveness and energy service delivery.

 

The aim of this book is two-fold:  to build knowledge of the multiple benefits of energy efficiency, and to demonstrate how policy makers and other stakeholders can use existing tools to measure and maximise the benefits they seek. Five key benefits areas – macroeconomic development; public budgets; health and well-being; industrial productivity; and energy delivery – are investigated in-depth, showing compelling returns when the value of multiple benefits is calculated alongside traditional benefits of energy demand and greenhouse gas emissions reductions. Considering multiple benefits also has important implications for unravelling one of the persistent challenges in energy efficiency – the rebound effect – revealing that it often signals a positive outcome in terms of achieving broader social and economic goals.

By identifying and quantifying a broader range of impacts of energy efficiency, the multiple benefits approach repositions energy efficiency as a mainstream tool for economic and social development, and has the potential to motivate higher uptake of energy efficiency opportunities in the market.

Research has shown that achieving lasting behavioural change in DSM is unlikely to take place if only individual behaviours are targeted while the context in which these behaviours are embedded remains the same. Best practices examples and social scientific studies have accumulated over the past years and provide interesting insights. This presentation will report on relevant behaviour change research and practicable recommendations and approaches in built environment, transport, smart metering and SME domains. This initiative, started as a task under the umbrella of the International Energy Agency, is entitled ´Closing the loop. Behavioural change in DSM: From Theory to Practice.